Chevron free seamless vector pattern set


The chevron seamless pattern is free and scaleabel vector set to use in commercial and personal design projects. This is such a popular effect, which I’m more than certain that you have seen in print design at some point. The set comes in four different colour variations, so your spoilt for choose when it comes to choosing, which is the best pattern for your design project.

License Details

The design resources distributed on Creative Nerds may be used in commercial and personal design projects, but may not be redistributed or modified for resell. Any further question or queries don’t hesitate to contact us.


How to load vector patterns into Illustrator

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cheveron seamless vector patterns Chevron free seamless vector pattern set

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Chevron free seamless vector pattern set


The chevron seamless pattern is free and scaleabel vector set to use in commercial and personal design projects. This is such a popular effect, which I’m more than certain that you have seen in print design at some point. The set comes in four different colour variations, so your spoilt for choose when it comes to choosing, which is the best pattern for your design project.

License Details

The design resources distributed on Creative Nerds may be used in commercial and personal design projects, but may not be redistributed or modified for resell. Any further question or queries don’t hesitate to contact us.


How to load vector patterns into Illustrator

Preview

cheveron seamless vector patterns Chevron free seamless vector pattern set

Download


Premium members: Paint splatter Photoshop brush set


A high resolution Photoshop brush set that includes 5 unique paint splatters. A great way to add an authentic paint effect to your designs. Exclusive to all premium members download and enjoy its a great brush set.

If you’re interested in becoming a Creative Nerds Premium membership feel free to sign up by clicking here. You will be granted access to a library of tons of high quality design resources for a year, as well as new resources which are added to Creative Nerds Premium through out your membership period.

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paint splatter brush set Premium members: Paint splatter Photoshop brush set

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The 7 Top eCommerce Themes You Need for Building Your Store

Inspired Magazine
Inspired Magazine - creativity & inspiration daily

Your first thoughts of what an online store should look like quite naturally might be along the lines of something unique and highly innovative, i.e., a store, the likes of which its visitors have never seen before. Innovation has its place in many types of website design, but that is not necessary the truth in the case of eCommerce websites –  and here is why.

Five things you should take into account to build a winner:

  • A little innovation may be good, but familiarity is much better for an online store. Heed Krug’s first law of usability: “Don’t make me think.”, and you’ll be much better off. Don’t make visitors have to try to figure out how to get what they want.
  • Keep your homepage banner simple. Users aren’t interested in a flashy banner while shopping. Overdoing your home page design can make your store look cheap.
  • Don’t be afraid to be a copycat. Display your products much the same as others display theirs. Your customers will appreciate it.
  • Think mobile – first, last, and always. Roughly have of your potential customers shop from mobile devices.
  • Select a fast, lightweight theme, and you have a much better chance at creating a fast and reliable eCommerce website.

XStore Responsive WooCommerce Theme

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XStore’s authors took the first law of usability seriously when then built this award- winning eCommerce theme. As a result, it’s exceptionally easy to use. You don’t have to puzzle your way through things, just as you don’t want your customers to have to figure out how to get from point A to point B while in shopping. You’ll have no problem at all getting from one place to the next while building page after beautiful page.

Hovering over XStore’s  27 demos will present you with some cool ideas you can use for your online shop, but everywhere you look you see that the examples given purposefully have that somewhat familiar look that makes customers comfortable, and keeps them engaged.

XStore is responsive and RTL ready, making it easier to connect with shoppers globally. Visual Composer is the builder of choice, and XStore is of course, 100% WooCommerce compatible. You will find this theme’s user support is super helpful and a set of video tutorials is included in the package to help you with installation, managing settings, and more.

Merchandiser

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Lightweight, fast, and reliable: that’s Merchandiser in a nutshell. There’s more to this minimalist theme than that of course, but you can still expect super response, and see it in your deliverables as well. If you’ve been burdened in the past by trying to get by with an over-bloated WP theme, or if what you want is a website-building tool that has the features you need, and nothing more, Merchandiser is definitely worth a close look.

Features include the ever-popular Visual Composer page builder for WordPress which, when teamed up with Merchandiser’s own Theme Customizer, gives you a host of customization options, plus the ability to preview and modify your site’s appearance settings. Off-canvas shopping cart and product quick view options are among this theme’s many pleasant surprises.

Merchandiser gives you the ability to sell anything you want online, and if you’re considering building an affiliate site, it has all the necessary features to support that as well.

Mystile

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Mystile is a clean, lightweight eCommerce theme. It’s responsive, and it comes bundled with plenty of options. It’s also more than just another WooCommerce- compatible theme. Mystile is a WooCommerce theme, and better yet, it’s a free download. It’s not supported as is however, but if you purchase any other WooCommerce product, the support is there.

Free is always a nice option when your entering new territory, or simply looking for a better way to build an online store.

Uncode – Creative Multiuse WordPress Theme

image007

Name a feature you simply must have to build an online store, and Uncode has it. Parallax scroll, one page scroll, pricing tables, counters and countdown, gallery    options –  and the list goes on. What many users like best about Uncode is its set of concepts you can select from to get an eCommerce project underway. These concepts are nicely packaged in five categories, plus there are 5 different special pages, each with a number of design options.

Divi

image009

Each of these eCommerce themes has it strengths. Divi’s lies in its building block approach and its use of customizable content modules – 46 of them. This combination enables you to build any type of website, including any type of eCommerce website (several of the content modules are dedicated to that specific purpose). With Divi, you can build any website quickly, and down to the minutest detail.

KLEO – Pro Community Focused, Multipurpose Theme

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KLEO, the #1 BuddyPress theme for 2016, has a lot going for it. This multipurpose theme is a great choice for your eCommerce needs, as well as for building community websites, publishing a blog, or putting in place a stunning portfolio to highlight your products, services, or accomplishments.

A set of 24 plugins is included, several of which have been designed specifically with online stores in mind. As you might expect, the WooCommerce plugin is among them.

Merchant WordPress Theme

image013

This hip, super-responsive, super-flexible, and translation ready theme will make converting your vision of what an award-winning online store should have in the    way of an awesome UX, into reality. Plus, since Merchant Easy Layout Creator lives up to its authors’ claims, building your online shop should be a thoroughly enjoyable experience.

This 100% WooCommerce compatible eCommerce theme provides everything you need to showcase your products, create a portfolio, or publish a catalog.

It can sometimes be difficult to make a choice, when presented with a selection of top-quality themes, where each one seems to have a certain advantage over the next. If you’re still fairly new to web design, you might consider the free download as a means of getting your feet wet. Otherwise, it’s more a matter of seeing which of the special features each of these themes highlights might make your work easier and better.

Once you get started, don’t rely on your chosen theme to do all of the work for you. Take the design tips presented up front to heart, focus on usability at all times, and you should do well.

This post The 7 Top eCommerce Themes You Need for Building Your Store was written by Inspired Mag Team and first appearedon Inspired Magazine.

From Print to Web: A Step-By-Step Tutorial

Inspired Magazine
Inspired Magazine - creativity & inspiration daily

You’ve probably noticed that all across the Internet—at least the parts that matter—websites are getting more and more similar to one another, so much so that it sometimes can be difficult to keep track of which site you’re looking at.

In some ways, this homogenization of the web has been a good thing for users in the sense that it has made all the sites conform to an expected standard.  For (genuine) designers and developers, however, this has become a bit of a problem.  It has allowed millions of “Cheap Charlie” developers to spring up offering cut-price websites, which has had a detrimental effect on the whole industry in many different ways.

Conformity has stifled innovation, and many usability issues with the “standard design” have become persistent and pervasive, especially when it comes to the needs of mobile users.  Ironically, full service advertising agencies are among the worst offenders for utilizing the shortcut design method, which when you think about it is completely the wrong direction for them to be going in.

Advertising agencies expend a lot of resources designing epic print ads.  These ads also require a very serious investment from the client, usually in the realm of tens-of-thousands.  So why undermine that?  Why strip away the effectiveness of the print campaign with a lacklustre generic website?  It’s time to shake things up and take back the web for the professionals.  It means taking your print ad and turning it into a website, but without losing any of the benefits of either a print ad or a website.

In this article, we’re going to proceed step-by-step through the process of turning a successful print ad into a website.  While your own projects are likely to extend on this concept and branch out in completely new directions, this project will hopefully get us innovating again.  It’s what the web needs, and it’s the only way you’re going to remain relevant in a world where people are being told “anyone can make a website”.  Let’s prove that you’re still a necessary part of the site creation process.

1. First, we need to reference our print ad

Before you can even begin to build a web page based on a print ad, you need to know how that ad actually looks.  In the case of this project, we’re looking at a print ad that was created for a VIP dining club in Thailand called “Bancharee House”.  Here’s the original version of the double page print ad:

doc81img001

Obviously this is compressed down to fit on our screen here, so you probably can’t see all the finer details, but you can get the overall impression.

2. Now you need a web page

All websites have to start somewhere, and most of them start with the first page.  In the case of this site, it will be the only page.  For now we just need to build the page’s skeleton.  It needs to be declared, have a head and body section defined, and include links to its external dependencies.

The dependencies for this project will be Bootstrap, jQuery, a custom CSS file, and of course all the images that will be components of the page.

Setting that up is simple enough:

doc81img002

The idea of those big commented headings is that they make finding your way around in a long source document much easier.  Those two javascript files are added at the end of the body section for reasons explained in Bootstrap’s documentation.  Using Bootstrap is not a compulsory requirement for a project like this, but here it is just being used as a time-saver.  There are plenty of other ways to achieve the same result.

The above lines are all that is necessary to establish the skeleton of the web page, but of course this won’t do anything interesting by itself.

3. Add some style

There are many different ways to interpret the source advertisement.  One way is to see it as two narrow columns that are spaced wide apart.  One of the first things you’ll notice when working with a webpage is you have a lot less space compared to designing for a printed page.  Text is bigger, it takes up more room, and it’s harder to control the exact positioning of individual text characters.

For this design, the columns are going to have to be slightly larger than in the real ad, and the text is also going to have to be slightly larger.  There are things we can get away with in print that we really can’t do online (although when it comes to what we actually write, the opposite is true!).  We’ll just use two Bootstrap columns to take care of spacing, and a container inside the first column will provide a column-like effect.  We’ll have 3 vertical layers, with the core layer on the bottom, a layer called “home” for the content to sit on, and the top (hidden) layer where modal information will display.

Let’s start with the core layer:

doc81img003

The effect of this CSS code will make the website look like this:

doc81img004

Now you can see from this one of the limitations that you have to make a choice about.  If you want to retain the ability to scale the background image to suit any situation, you may have to accept some minor variation from the original image.  Otherwise you can choose a fixed-width image, but that can be worse in many ways, which is why it’s probably not the best choice.  A bit of compromise is necessary.

Here is the original:

doc81img005

How much of the picture we lose depends on the resolution and available viewing area of the device the page is being viewed on.  But as you can see from the example (1290 x 768 at full width), the focus on the main dish is much more pronounced, the handles of the cutlery get lost, the other dishes in the top corner are also somewhat lost.

A possible solution to this problem is to change the minimum height property to something larger than what a user’s screen might be expected to be, but then you’ll need to add overflow-y:hidden to prevent vertical scrollbars from appearing on smaller screens.  Here’s what happens when the minimum height is set to 700px:

doc81img006

Which at least brings the other dishes into the frame and shows some more of the cutlery.  On a less wide screen, things would also be different.  With the viewing area only 1024px wide, the image is a lot closer to the original:

doc81img007

Next thing we need to do is set up the columns for the “home” layer, like so:

doc81img008

What we have above is a column called screenL (which is the left column) and two variations of the right column called screenRsmall and screenRbig.  When the page is viewed on a small screen, defined by Bootstrap as “xs”, the right column will have mostly the same settings as the left column.  The right column doesn’t have any background color when viewed on a larger screen, and has different font settings.

4. Put the columns into the page

This is where the website starts to take shape.  Now it’s not just a background image any more, but how much of a change you will notice after this edit depends a bit on what browser you use.  The change being made here is very subtle, because it is entirely structural, and only noticeable because we’ve set a background color.

This code is added just after the body tag:

doc81img009

The effect of it is too subtle to be picked up by a screenshot, so we should add a little content to make sure it works as intended.

doc81img010

Which will produce this result:

doc81img011

We can see that the overlay is working nicely and the font looks close enough to the original.  Now we can choose between adding the second column or adding the rest of the left column content.  It doesn’t really matter, but putting in the rest of the left column content will probably help give more visual definition.

This is how that would look:

doc81img012

doc81img013

So this is the half way point for achieving the original look of the ad.  Now we just need to put in the right column and its content, and the most important part of the task will be complete.  We start with adding the code to define the existence of the right column:

doc81img014

Visually, this won’t have any effect except on the “xs” sized screen.  The content of these two columns is almost identical, but not quite. 

Next, we need to add the logo.  This just needs one line to be added in screenRbig and screenRsmall:

doc81img015

For the small screen, there is no pull-right added to the class declaration. Either way, we should get this:

doc81img016

Because we used pull-right on the image in screenRbig, and because the text that follows also needs to be pulled right, that means we need to add an extra div to prevent these items from stacking horizontally.  And although it’s not strictly needed in screenRsmall, it doesn’t hurt to include it, and it provides some white space without any effort, so we might as well paste it in:

doc81img017

Then we just add the remaining lines for this column:

doc81img018

Again you can see the only difference is that we don’t pull right on a smaller screen.  Having done all this, we now have a result that is reasonably close to the look of the original ad:

doc81img019

And here is a side-by-side comparison, showing where it has been necessary to compromise:

doc81img020

The image shows clearly the differences between print and web.  With print, we normally have more vertical space, and we don’t have to worry about title bars, menu bars, scroll bars or status bars.  We can also pull the font tighter without losing readability.  But these can normally be acceptable compromises.

5. Transform it into a website

What actually makes a website be a website is that it is meant to be interactive. If all we do is replicate the print ad without providing any functionality, it doesn’t deserve to be called a website.  So we start by adding a button:

doc81img021

doc81img022

Bootstrap’s stock colors don’t contrast well, so we fix that with some custom CSS in our CSS file:

doc81img023

doc81img024

Great, now we have a button that won’t make us blind when we look at it, but what does it do?  Well, its role is to put a functional web page inside our otherwise static advertisement.  This is a game-changer right here, because it is completely upsetting the whole evolutionary process of website development.

Sites have been getting bigger and more complex.  Their navigational structures dominate the page and determine what we will see.  Here we have a site that is incredibly simple—on the surface at least—offering only a single button to take you deeper into the site, and as you will see, once you get to this new information, it doesn’t introduce any extra complexity.

This part of the project begins with defining a basic Bootstrap modal window:

doc81img025

doc81img026

Now we add structure for tabbed navigation:

doc81img027

And define some CSS instructions for how to handle the display of these tabs:

doc81img028

doc81img029

Then we add the tab body items:

doc81img030

doc81img031

And fill them with content:

doc81img032

Adding some css for the new image classes created:

doc81img033

With the result:

doc81img034

At this point we have successfully created a hybrid between a website and a print ad.  It derives the best from both, opening with a strong visual message untroubled by clutter and distractions, but still having access to however much additional information or other functionality we want to provide.

There are additional steps that need to be completed before the website could be considered “finished” in the sense that it provides everything a user might want from it.  Additional tabs should be added to make it possible to automatically check availability and make reservations, send an email requesting more information, and perhaps even provide video content.

All of these additional features are easy to add later.  It’s also important to understand that the size of the modal window can be increased, even up to the the full width and height of the viewport, so don’t feel that this design concept constrains you in any way.  Neither is it necessary to use a modal at all.  There are so many different ways that you could connect the user with more information.

When you have a print ad like this, the clients will have already invested somewhere in the vicinity of $35,000 to have the ad created and placed for them in a major publication.  Wasting more time and money creating something completely new isn’t going to be as inviting to the client as being able to tell them that you can integrate their website with their print advertising campaign to create a winning combination.

Note: things happen fast on the internet.  Since this article was written, the subject website has already had some design alterations.  You can get the most recent version of the source code by visiting the website and selecting View Page Source in your browser.

header image courtesy of Pixabay

This post From Print to Web: A Step-By-Step Tutorial was written by Inspired Mag Team and first appearedon Inspired Magazine.

Must read blogs for learning or mastering Photoshop and Illustrator


A beautiful aspect of the of the online digital design community is theirs tons of great design blogs out there for learning Photoshop and illustrator. Online blogs played a pivotal part in my journey of refining my design skills, and becoming a better designer. The roundup compiles the top 14 blogs for learning or even mastering Photoshop and illustrator, without the need to spend large sums of money to invest in that knowledge. So theirs some tremendous blogs featured on this list, and cant recommend highly enough to check each one out.

Please feel free to share in the comments any awsome blogs out there we may have not included in the blog post. We may even feature blog in a future blog post.

1. Text Tuts

The tutorials presented here aim to explain how to achieve some awesome text effects, using a variety of techniques and Photoshop elements, such as Layer Styles, Filters, Shapes, Brushes, etc.. The tips introduced can be used in many ways and not only for creating the text effects.text tuts Must read blogs for learning or mastering Photoshop and Illustrator

2. Vectips

vector tips Must read blogs for learning or mastering Photoshop and Illustrator

3. PSD Vault

In operation since 2008, PSD Vault (www.psdvault.com) is a blog that focuses on providing high quality, step-by-step Photoshop tutorials to all Photoshop lovers and hobbyists around the world.psd vault Must read blogs for learning or mastering Photoshop and Illustrator

4. PSD Dude

lorem ipsumpsd due Must read blogs for learning or mastering Photoshop and Illustrator

5. Gomedia

Go Media believes in creating remarkable design experiences. You will go beyond the boundaries of technology to create provocative artwork & marketing that people will notice.You are not a traditional ad agency. Our clients trust us to deliver inspired creativity unique to them, personal service, clarity of what to expect and certainty in what it will cost. The design community relies on us to blaze new trails, provide inspiration and break rules if we have to. You strive to create bold, impactful and authentic work, each with its own wow factor. go media Must read blogs for learning or mastering Photoshop and Illustrator

6. Vector clove

A great blog for learning some great illustrator effects.vector cove Must read blogs for learning or mastering Photoshop and Illustrator

7. Blog Spoon Graphics

The aim is to help you create cool designs by sharing tutorials, resources and inspiration.

blog spoon graphics Must read blogs for learning or mastering Photoshop and Illustrator

8. Pixel Buddha

They just realized that crafting useful content for creative community fits  much more, than solving specific tasks of our clients. A blog focused on design tutorials and resources. pixel budda Must read blogs for learning or mastering Photoshop and Illustrator

9. Digital Arts Online

Digital Arts addresses the needs of those within the exploding digital media market by providing relevant and forward thinking content, and by consistently running more exclusive reviews and features than any other website in the market.digital arts Must read blogs for learning or mastering Photoshop and Illustrator

10. Photoshop Star

Step by step free Photoshop tutorials for any skill level.photoshopstar Must read blogs for learning or mastering Photoshop and Illustrator

11. Design tuts plus

Browse thousands of free tutorials to help you learn and expand your graphic design and illustration skills.tutsplus Must read blogs for learning or mastering Photoshop and Illustrator

12. Photoshop Lady

Photoshop Lady aims to collect the best and free photoshop tutorials around the internet. All of the high quality photoshop tutorials are categorized into 3D Effect, Abstract Effect, Drawing Effect, Photo Effect, Text Effect, Texture & Patterns and User Interface Design.photoshop lady Must read blogs for learning or mastering Photoshop and Illustrator

13. Abduzeedo

Abduzeedo a great source for inspirations, which consistently produces great Photoshop and illustrator tutorials. abduzeedo Must read blogs for learning or mastering Photoshop and Illustrator

14. Vector Diary

Vector Diary is a popular blog offering great illustrator tutorials and tips. It was created by Tony Soh, a graphic designer, who has great passion in illustration. Tony has written one of the most popular tutorial to learn illustrator and has helped more than 20,000 people. On top of that, his tutorials and tips has helped designers improve their illustration skills and have received great feedback. vector diary Must read blogs for learning or mastering Photoshop and Illustrator


Squared Watercolour paint dabs free Photoshop brush set


This is another one of our epic Photoshop brushes if I’m not so modest to say so myself. This is a must download set to add to your collection if you’re an brush user avid. The brush set contains large brush strokes each over 1000PX. This is a great textures for digital designs especially can seeing this working quite well in backgrounds for a website, or maybe even on a leaflet.

We have tons of great free Photoshop brushes we even have category to showcase all these great free brushes check it out here.

License Details

The design resources distributed on Creative Nerds may be used in commercial and personal design projects, but may not be redistributed or modified for resell. Any further question or queries don’t hesitate to contact us.


How to load brushes into Photoshop

Preview

squared watercolor paint dabs Squared Watercolour paint dabs free Photoshop brush set


DRYing out WordPress Asset Enqueuing

WordPress has several handy functions for granular control over external assets. Specifically wp_enqueue_script(), wp_register_script(), wp_enqueue_style(), wp_register_style(). These functions allow us to register assets so they’re available and can be added to the page where applicable.

While these functions give a fair amount of control, if you have a complex site you can end up repeating the same four functions over and over again. This not only contributes to visual clutter it increases the likelihood of making a mistake like a misplaced argument or typo.

Realizing this at 3.7 DESIGNS, we started looking for a better way to handle asset registering and enqueuing. What we came up with is as follows.

Define once

Rather than repeating wp_register_ and wp_enqueue_ for each individual asset, we decided defining all the assets once via a multidimensional array would cut down on needless repetition and code bloat.

Each asset is defined using a nested array with keys for the relevant arguments passed into wp_enqueue__ and wp_register_. Let’s look and see what’s required to register a script.

wp_register_script( string $handle, string $src, array $deps = array(), string|bool|null $ver = false, bool $in_footer = false );

We need a handle, file path, an array of dependencies, an optional version number, and whether it should show up in the footer or not.

So our scripts array could look something like this:

apply_filters( 'threeseven_global_scripts', $global_scripts = array(
	'global'	=>	array(
		'handle'	=>	'global',
		'uri'		=>	get_template_directory_uri() . '/dist/js/global.min.js',
		'deps'		=>	array( 'jquery' ),
		'ver'		=>	THEME_VER,
		'footer'	=>	true,
	),
	'vendor'	=>	array(
		'handle'	=>	'vendor',
		'uri'		=>	get_template_directory_uri() . '/dist/js/vendor.min.js',
		'deps'		=>	array(),
		'ver'		=>	THEME_VER,
		'footer'	=>	true,
	),
	'customizer'	=>	array(
		'handle'	=>	'propagate_customizer',
		'uri'		=>	get_template_directory_uri() . '/dist/js/customizer.js',
		'deps'		=>	array( 'customize-preview' ),
		'ver'		=>	THEME_VER,
		'footer'	=>	true,
		'condition' =>  is_customize_preview(),
	),
	'comment-reply'	=>	array(
		'handle'	=>	'comment-reply',
		'condition' =>  is_singular() && comments_open() && get_option( 'thread_comments' ),
		'register'  =>  false
		),
) );

Each asset has keys that correspond to arguments passed into the register function. You may have noticed we’ve added the additional keys of condition and register. We’ll use these to determine if the script needs to be registered and where it should be enqueued. More on this later.

Now we probably want to set some defaults so we don’t have to add unnecessary keys to our array. For example, most scripts will be registered before being enqueued. We can store those defaults in a separate array:

$default = 	array(
			'condition' =>  true,
			'register'  =>  true,
			'footer'    =>  false,
	);

Here we’re setting that scripts should be enqueued, registered and included in the HEAD by default.

Now that we’ve defined our defaults and scripts, we need to parse the array.

Parse once

Our variables are then passed into a function that will parse the array.

Our parse script looks like this:

three_seven_enqueue_scripts( $global_scripts , $default);

function three_seven_enqueue_scripts( $scripts , $default ) {
	foreach( $scripts as $script ) {
		
		$script = array_merge( $default , $script);
		
		if( $script['register'] !== false ){
			// Register the script so we can conditionally use it elsewhere
			wp_register_script( $script[ 'handle' ], $script[ 'uri' ], $script[ 'deps' ], $script[ 'ver' ], $script[ 'footer' ] );
		}
		
		if( $script['condition'] && $script['print'] !== false ){
			// These are global, so enqueue
			wp_enqueue_script( $script[ 'handle' ] );
		}
	}
}

First we merge each script with our $default array. Because the $script array is passed into array_merge second, the $script array will have priority on duplicate keys.

This is also where our register and condition keys come into play.

The register key indicates if the script needs to be registered (duh.) This allows us to use scripts that are bundled and already registered through WordPress like jQuery UI. The condition key allows us to dictate where the script should be loaded.

You probably already do this by putting if statements in your asset enqueue function, limiting assets to specific situations like only enqueuing on the homepage. If you look at our array, you’ll notice we’re essentially using the same approach, just streamlining it.

'condition' =>  is_singular() && comments_open() && get_option( 'thread_comments' ),

In the case of the comment-reply script, we only want to enqueue it on single posts that have comments open if threaded comments are enabled. When all three conditions are met, this will return true and the script will be enqueued.

And we’re done! This is our first iteration and I’m sure there are ways to improve it (we’d love to hear your suggestions!). The result is cleaner code, less repetition. and fewer chances for simple mistakes.

Here is the entire code for those interested:

function threeseven_theme_assets() {

        define( THEME_VER, '1.0' );

	// Setup global scripts
	wp_enqueue_script( 'jquery' );
	
	$default = 	array(
			'condition' =>  true,
			'register'  =>  true,
			'print'     =>  true,
	);
	
	apply_filters( 'threeseven_global_scripts', $global_scripts = array(
		'global'	=>	array(
			'handle'	=>	'global',
			'uri'		=>	get_template_directory_uri() . '/dist/js/global.min.js',
			'deps'		=>	array( 'jquery' ),
			'ver'		=>	THEME_VER,
			'footer'	=>	true,
		),
		'vendor'	=>	array(
			'handle'	=>	'vendor',
			'uri'		=>	get_template_directory_uri() . '/dist/js/vendor.min.js',
			'deps'		=>	array(),
			'ver'		=>	THEME_VER,
			'footer'	=>	true,
		),
		'customizer'	=>	array(
			'handle'	=>	'propagate_customizer',
			'uri'		=>	get_template_directory_uri() . '/dist/js/customizer.js',
			'deps'		=>	array( 'customize-preview' ),
			'ver'		=>	THEME_VER,
			'footer'	=>	true,
			'condition' =>  is_customize_preview(),
		),
		'comment-reply'	=>	array(
			'handle'	=>	'comment-reply',
			'condition' =>  is_singular() && comments_open() && get_option( 'thread_comments' ),
			'register'  =>  false
		),
	) );

	three_seven_enqueue_scripts( $global_scripts , $default);

	// Setup global styles
	apply_filters( 'threeseven_global_styles', $global_styles = array(
		'global'	=>	array(
			'handle'	=>	'global',
			'uri'		=>	get_stylesheet_directory_uri() . '/dist/css/style.min.css',
			'ver'		=>	THEME_VER,
		),
	) );


	three_seven_enqueue_styles( $global_styles , $default );

}
add_action( 'wp_enqueue_scripts', 'threeseven_theme_assets', 0 );

function three_seven_enqueue_scripts( $scripts , $default ) {

	foreach( $scripts as $script ) {
		
		$script = array_merge( $default , $script);
		
		if( $script['register'] !== false ){
			// Register the script so we can conditionally use it elsewhere
			wp_register_script( $script[ 'handle' ], $script[ 'uri' ], $script[ 'deps' ], $script[ 'ver' ], $script[ 'footer' ] );
		}
		
		if( $script['condition'] && $script['print'] !== false ){
			// These are global, so enqueue
			wp_enqueue_script( $script[ 'handle' ] );
		}

	}

}

function three_seven_enqueue_styles( $styles , $default ) {
	
	foreach( $styles as $style ) {
		$style = array_merge( $default , $style);
		
		if( $style['register'] !== false ){
			// Register the stle so we can conditionally load / unload
			wp_register_style( $style[ 'handle' ], $style[ 'uri' ], $style[ 'ver' ] );
		}
		if( $style['condition'] && $style['print'] !== false){
			// These are global so enqueue
			wp_enqueue_style( $style[ 'handle' ] );
		}
	}

}

The post DRYing out WordPress Asset Enqueuing appeared first on Psychology of Web Design | 3.7 Blog.

100 Free Fairy Tale themed icon set


The is another jaw dropping icon set courtesy of the great guys over a Free Pik. This includes in total 100 fairy tale icons. Hands down the best fairy tale set, and even better is available for free of charge. The set includes a range of various icons from Fairies to battle axes. The icon set comes in SVG and PNG format, so perfect for web and print.

This is a tremendous icon set certainly a must download. The set includes 50 wild animal icons from Siberian weasels to musk deer’s a wide range of various animals. The icon set comes too in both vector and PNG format perfect for print or even digital projects.

Check out Freepik

A special thanks to the team over at Free Pik who have kindly crafted together this spectacular free Icon set exclusive to Creative Nerds readers. Please download the icon set, and tell us what you think in the comments section. good freebies thumb 100 Free Fairy Tale themed icon set

License Details

The design resources distributed on Creative Nerds may be used in commercial and personal design projects, but may not be redistributed or modified for resell. Any further question or queries don’t hesitate to contact us.

Preview

fairy tale preview 100 Free Fairy Tale themed icon set

Download here


78 Fantastic Fonts and Graphic Elements for 97% Off!

Inspired Magazine
Inspired Magazine - creativity & inspiration daily

Here at Inspired Mag, we are huge lovers of the products listed and shared on TheHungryJPEG.com. Especially the monthly bundles, which include a wide range of fonts and graphics each month for a price of just $29. This is around 96% OFF Regular Retail Price.

This particular pack includes 65 Fonts and 13 graphics packs, which for $29, is an unbelievable deal. Especially when considering most of these fonts retail between $10 – $15.

Here is a quick overview of all the fonts included:

preview-image

Just a few of the included goods:

Rupture Family by Maghrib

The Rupture font family includes 3 fabulous fonts. Two with drop shadows and one regular helping add depth and class to your designs. We love combining all three in quotes and design work. The shadowed versions work great as eye catching headers.

rupture

Twilight Script by Get Studio

Twilight Script is a dry hand-brushed font, designed to combine perfectly and allow you to create stunning hand-lettering quickly and easily. Ideal for logos, handwritten quotes, product packaging and merchandising. The swashes are a welcome bonus with this typeface.

twilight

Beautiful Struggle by Get Studio 

Up now is one of the best font duos we have seen in a long time! The all caps version is a bold and striking font that compliments the script version of this font perfectly. As well as its flowing feel, this font is slightly rough so looks very authentic when used in quotes and logos.

beautiful

Salamanta by Genesis Lab

One of the most diverse fonts in this bundle. Salamanta includes tons of additional characters that are fully accessible due to its PUA encoding. We love the subtle swirls and large swashes that make this typeface truly one of a kind.

salamanta

The Tropical by Dirtyline Studio

Introducing The Tropical. 5 Fonts with fantastic extra characters! A fontastic set of carefully-paired, handcrafted fonts, designed to work together in harmony to create awesome hand-lettered typographic designs. We love this summer sensation and so will you!

tropical

Native Land by Get Studio

Native Land – A funky brush font duo that gives as good as it gets! Super fantastic when used for moody quotes layered over ponderous images. Also included is a set of swashes that lay under the words with a great flourish that really helps to finish the rough and ready look.

native

Antebellum by Giemons

Antebellum comes in two font versions, regular and rough. This monoline typeface is perfect for offsetting your script fonts in your quotes and also standing alone as a eye-catching header. We love the versatility of this font and also the great way it can be read at any size!

antebellum

Amore Mio by pixelbypixel

This new font by pixelbypixel is full of amore because it was hand painted and carefully designed to look super pretty! We think the designer has succeeded in doing so and we love the girliness that flows through this particular typeface.

amore

See the full list of goods here.

Pricing:

For a limited time only, you can get this unique collection for just $29, hurry, as this offer of 96% off the  retail price is only available for the month of June.

This post 78 Fantastic Fonts and Graphic Elements for 97% Off! was written by Inspired Mag Team and first appearedon Inspired Magazine.

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